Disturbances in the cloud

Cloud computing is cool, no doubt about that. There have never been more good looking and futuristic looking schematics been made in Visio. Thousands of presentations, workshops and even conferences have been held on the subject.

One question however has not be clearly answered yet … what about data ownership? What about privacy of that data? When your applications are running in the cloud you are also handing over your data to whoever is running the data center. How sure are you that they protect this data as they should do? What about these situations:

  1. Your cloud partner goes out of business and your data becomes a valuable asset that can be sold to pay of debt. How well are you protected from this scenario? Or … what are the guarantees about confidentiality? Think SalesForce …
  2. Your cloud partner goes out of business without any warnings, your applications are offline, your data is not accessible. Worst case you got a couple of days notice, best case a couple of weeks. Does your disaster recovery plan takes this into account? How fast can you move to a new cloud partner or your own data center? How much data will you loose? How recent is the data you go online with after recovery?
  3. Your cloud partner decides to disable a feature in their application, a feature you depend on. Does your disaster recovery plan takes this into account? This is not far fetched, in a small way this is what happened when Microsoft decided to disable anonymous comments on their Live Blog. They even did this retroactively and so revealed identity information of authors who previously had been anonymous.

None of these scenarios is purely technical in nature and none of these scenarios are far fetched. You can probably think of many more realistic and sure to happen situations.

In relation to the 3th scenario … how many companies have application versions that are far behind the lastest public version purely because of functionality or compatibility they depend on? At least all of the companies I have came into contact with are in this situation. If you run everything on your own servers you have a greater deal of control then you can imagine at first. Companies should do their homework when moving some of this into the cloud, they are often giving up far more control then they think they do and want to do. Contracts alone won’t solve it either.

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2 thoughts on “Disturbances in the cloud

  1. Pingback: Cloudy forecast « Identity Blogger

  2. Pingback: Ruminations on Architecture » Blog Archive » Online Evictions

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